Executive Function: Impulse Control   

Executive function refers to a group of mental skills responsible for getting things done. These skills include an individual’s ability to plan, pay attention, organize, self-regulate emotions, self-monitor, and stay focused on tasks. The three main areas of executive function include: Working Memory, Cognitive Flexibility, and Inhibitory Control.

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Rainy Days- Weekend Vibes

Rainy days giving you the blues?  Wondering what you can do to have fun within your home, get some energy out and feel rested afterwards?  No worries, rainy days do not need to mean that your mood and energy levels inside must mirror what is happening outside.  There is a variety of activities you can do as a couple, individually and as a family.

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December 2018: The Miracle of Oil- Position of the Month by Our Sex Therapist

There are a lot of adults who are currently in survival mode with the holiday season in full swing, so I thought that this month’s highlighted position could provide some time for sexual connection with partners and still be a bit festive. 

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Houston Holiday Activities for the Entire Family!

As a Houstonian that happens to have a family and LOVES the holidays, I decided to compile a list of some of my favorite go-to holiday spots. Whether you are creating new traditions, love celebrating the holidays, or needing fresh ideas, read our list below!

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Utilizing I Feel Statements

Ever had an argument or conversation with a significant other where you walked away thinking, “That conversation did not start or end like I anticipated!”  I think most people can relate to this experience.  One of the most helpful things that I have found for couple is to start the conversation in a better, less defensive way so that the conversation continues to be more open and non-judgmental.  Dr. John Gottman has perfected the method for couples to begin a conversation in a non-defensive manner called softened start-ups.

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Is it Anxiety?

Research shows children can begin experiencing anxiety in early childhood. As adults, we often think of anxiety as evidenced by constant worry and fidgeting. While children may exhibit these symptoms, there are a number of others ways children experience anxiety. Anxiety presents itself in a plethora of ways, such as

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AD/HD: To Tell Them or Not to Tell Them, that is the Question

our child was just diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD). One of the first things that pops up may be, “do I tell them or not.” I whole heartedly advocate for telling you child about their diagnosis. Not telling your child about their AD/HD diagnosis may cause them to feel like having AD/HD or being different from others is shameful.

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How My "Bad Parenting" Can Help Us Recognize The Power of Our Thoughts

Your situation doesn’t cause you to feel a certain way. I’ll repeat this in a different way, what happens to you doesn’t cause you to feel a certain way. I talk about this a lot with my clients, but I really FELT it recently.

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The Power of Giving & Thanks

As much as I love summer, the holiday season is probably my favorite time of year. For me, it’s a time for family gatherings, celebrating time-honored traditions, and connecting with friends near and far. The good food and warmth and laughter I share with friends and family bring me so much joy. As the resident gratitude ambassador, this is my time of year. I’m thankful year round, but this season brings about a greater sense of reflection on what I have instead of what I don’t have. And how I can turn something seemingly unwelcome into something valuable.

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Overreactions, Exaggerations, and Tantrums, Oh My!

I am big on family systems therapy, even when working with individuals. This means that when I work with an individual client I keep in mind the dynamics of the entire family.

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Managing a Meltdown

Last week, you read about how to tame a tantrum. This week, I want to provide you with further information on how to identify and help your child cope with a meltdown. Remember, tantrums often are a result of a trigger that a child can recognize. A meltdown is usually a result of overstimulation. For example, a child may have a tantrum if they do not get a toy at the store. A child may have a meltdown if they are surrounded by too many people in their class room.

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November Position of The Month From Our Sex Therapist: The Wishbone

Now that Halloween has been celebrated, we are quickly approaching the holiday season.  For November’s position of the month, I thought it would be fun to share a Thanksgiving themed position, the Wishbone. 

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