Posts tagged child psychologist near me
Using Positive Language

We are all guilty of using negative language, “stop that”, “don’t you dare”. In the moment, it is hard for caregivers to remember to stop and use positive language, especially when a child is doing something particularly dangerous.

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Trust Based Relational Intervention (TBRI)

You start working with a new therapist and she says that she will be utilizing TBRI with your child. What exactly does she mean? TBRI or Trust Based Relational Intervention was developed by Dr. Karyn Purvis and Dr. David Cross. It is a holistic, evidence based, and developmentally respectful practice that meets the needs of the whole child (Atchley, 2019).

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Co-regulation: Adolescents

Adolescence is a time when the body and brain undergo major changes. This brings about both trials and benefits for self-regulation. Brain systems responsible for emotions and sought rewards are more developed than their counterpart, cognitive control system. The cognitive control is responsible for good decision making and future planning.

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Understanding your child’s Love Language

Many of us have heard of the book, The Five Love Languages. Couples are the first to buy the book, hoping it will shed light on how to better show love to their partner. Yet, many stop there, and few think about what their child’s love language is. Understanding how your child gives and receives love is important to their emotional development. So, how do we show our children the love they need? First, identify their love language.

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Your Flexible Brain

This is also known as flexible thinking. Stephanie Madrigal and Michelle Garcia Winner, authors of Superflex: A Superhero Social Thinking Curriculum, use the term Superflex Thinking. Superflex Thinking is defined as, “a flexible thinking pattern in which a person is able to consider different points of view or ways to do something”

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Mindfulness is for kids too!

Mindfulness, or the practice of being present in the moment, is not just for adults, it’s for kids too! Children experience stress, sadness, and frustration, as well as symptoms of anxiety and depression, just like adults do. Often times, children have difficulty identifying and expressing their emotions, as well as regulating the emotions that they experience.

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