Posts tagged child counseling in houston
Using Positive Language

We are all guilty of using negative language, “stop that”, “don’t you dare”. In the moment, it is hard for caregivers to remember to stop and use positive language, especially when a child is doing something particularly dangerous.

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Co- regulation: what does it mean?

Self- regulation is foundational in fostering wellbeing across the lifespan and it begins with childhood. Have you ever witnessed an adult who “blows up” or becomes mute when adverse situations occur? Me too. Adults who exhibit these behaviors were once children who were never taught emotion regulation skills. So, one may be asking, “how do I teach my children self-regulation”? It begins with co-regulation.

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Taming a Tantrum

You’re in the grocery store, you see a child screaming, crying, and hiding behind a rack of clothes. We’ve all probably witnessed a version of this. We quietly say in our heads, “they sure know how to throw a tantrum.” I’ve worked with many parents who seek counseling for tantrums. As I began working with more and more children, I noticed a difference in the language. Some parents would describe their child’s behavior as tantrums while others expressed them as meltdowns. Curious, I did some research.

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Sensory Processing Disorder and Halloween

            Sensory processing occurs when our nervous system integrates information from our senses and organizes it in to appropriate behavioral responses, according to the situations we are in (Bennie, 2010). Sensory Processing Disorder or SPD occurs when, “sensory signals are either not detected or don’t get organized into appropriate responses” (“About SPD,” 2018).

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Perspective-Taking in Children

I once had a child tell me that taking someone else’s perspective is impossible. Children, especially those diagnosed with ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorders, tend to take things literally and struggle with perspective-taking. This is because of a child’s cognitive development. Jean Piaget, a renowned psychologist and child development theorist, developed the stage theory of cognitive development that is still used to understand children today. This theory includes 4 stages

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Effective Communication

We all have those days where kids are running around, and it feels like everything we say goes in one ear and out the other. This usually leads to frustrated kids and even more frustrated parents. Children may insist they didn’t hear us, and parents insist, “I’ve told you ten times!” Communication with children can be hard. Here are a few tips to make it easier.

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Positive Parenting: Say this, not that

 Whether we are parenting, teaching, or nannying, frustrations get the best of us. We find ourselves frustrated with crying children who do not comply with what we say. Out of frustrations come demands such as:

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Breathing Exercise of the Week!

Summer is south Texas is no picnic! Slogging through triple digit weather almost every day can definitely take its toll, making us hotter, more exhausted, and more irritated that we would ever wish to be! As I’m sure the title of this blog has given away already, one way to combat the adverse effects of this rising heat is through calm and focused breathing. So whether you’re trying to battle the external heat of the sun, or the internal heat of anger and frustration, this breathing exercise can provide the cool-down you’re craving!


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Hurricane Harvey: A Year Later

As we come upon the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Harvey, we may experience a multitude of emotions. Some may feel a sense of relief that the hardship of the flood is over as they move back into their homes and continue with daily life tasks. However, others of us may still sense the emotional turmoil that Hurricane Harvey left us with.

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Why a Pause Actually Creates Growth in Your Life

I’ve learned throughout my years as a counselor and boss that people hate change. In fact, people loathe change. There is something that is part of our human experience that makes us resistant or hesitant to the change experience.

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