Posts tagged child counseling 77007
Building Impulse Control

Impulse control is an essential skill for completing daily tasks. Impulse control takes place in our prefrontal cortex, the area of the brain that manages executive functions. Children’s brains are continually growing and certain activities can help facilitate growth.

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Co-regulation: Infancy to Pre-school

Children experience periods of rapid growth in areas of the brain associated with self-regulation. Piggy- backing off of the toddler years, it is important to continue to reinforce emotion identification, perspective-taking, calm down strategies, and problem-solving. I can not express enough how important it is to model the behavior and skills you are teaching your children.

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Co- regulation: what does it mean?

Self- regulation is foundational in fostering wellbeing across the lifespan and it begins with childhood. Have you ever witnessed an adult who “blows up” or becomes mute when adverse situations occur? Me too. Adults who exhibit these behaviors were once children who were never taught emotion regulation skills. So, one may be asking, “how do I teach my children self-regulation”? It begins with co-regulation.

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Teaching Kids Body Boundaries

Imagine you are getting ready to leave when grandma reaches down and kisses their grandchild. Your child accepts the kiss but as soon as they get in the car, they express their strong dislike for grandma’s kisses. You feel conflicted on what to say. You don’t want to hurt grandmas feelings, but you also want to make your kid feel comfortable. This is a common situation and a perfect open door to begin talking to your child about their body boundaries and consent.

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Overreactions, Exaggerations, and Tantrums, Oh My!

I am big on family systems therapy, even when working with individuals. This means that when I work with an individual client I keep in mind the dynamics of the entire family.

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Managing a Meltdown

Last week, you read about how to tame a tantrum. This week, I want to provide you with further information on how to identify and help your child cope with a meltdown. Remember, tantrums often are a result of a trigger that a child can recognize. A meltdown is usually a result of overstimulation. For example, a child may have a tantrum if they do not get a toy at the store. A child may have a meltdown if they are surrounded by too many people in their class room.

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Sensory Processing Disorder and Halloween

            Sensory processing occurs when our nervous system integrates information from our senses and organizes it in to appropriate behavioral responses, according to the situations we are in (Bennie, 2010). Sensory Processing Disorder or SPD occurs when, “sensory signals are either not detected or don’t get organized into appropriate responses” (“About SPD,” 2018).

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The Power of Pause

I work with children and parents who often have trouble “pausing”. As humans, our first instinct is to react when a situation arises. When our child is not listening to us, our first instinct is to respond with a demand. It usually sounds something like, “If you don’t _____, I will____”. These reactions, in part, are due to time restraints, stress, and a lack of understanding of what our child’s behavior may be indicating.

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All Behavior is Communication

Listening to the behavior and responding to the emotion the child is trying to communicate is the path to fostering emotion regulation.

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Understanding your child’s Love Language

Many of us have heard of the book, The Five Love Languages. Couples are the first to buy the book, hoping it will shed light on how to better show love to their partner. Yet, many stop there, and few think about what their child’s love language is. Understanding how your child gives and receives love is important to their emotional development. So, how do we show our children the love they need? First, identify their love language.

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The Importance of Empathy

Empathy. The word of the year. We hear about it from researchers, teachers, therapists, and our fellow parents. As humans, we could all use a little more empathy. We often confuse empathy with sympathy. To sympathize is to feel bad for how another is feeling; to empathize is to genuinely sit with another in their feeling. Empathy is seeing with the eyes of another, listening with ears of another, and feeling with the heart of another. Today I want to talk about the importance of empathy in parenting.

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