Posts tagged play therapy in the heights
School Readiness Camp-Empathy and Perspective Taking/Teamwork

Welcome to week two of my three-week blog series coving our upcoming School Readiness Camp. This week’s blog will take a closer look at empathy and perspective taking as well as teamwork. Below are links to my two previous blogs.

Read More
Building Impulse Control

Impulse control is an essential skill for completing daily tasks. Impulse control takes place in our prefrontal cortex, the area of the brain that manages executive functions. Children’s brains are continually growing and certain activities can help facilitate growth.

Read More
Using Positive Language

We are all guilty of using negative language, “stop that”, “don’t you dare”. In the moment, it is hard for caregivers to remember to stop and use positive language, especially when a child is doing something particularly dangerous.

Read More
Co-regulation: Infancy to Pre-school

Children experience periods of rapid growth in areas of the brain associated with self-regulation. Piggy- backing off of the toddler years, it is important to continue to reinforce emotion identification, perspective-taking, calm down strategies, and problem-solving. I can not express enough how important it is to model the behavior and skills you are teaching your children.

Read More
Co- regulation: what does it mean?

Self- regulation is foundational in fostering wellbeing across the lifespan and it begins with childhood. Have you ever witnessed an adult who “blows up” or becomes mute when adverse situations occur? Me too. Adults who exhibit these behaviors were once children who were never taught emotion regulation skills. So, one may be asking, “how do I teach my children self-regulation”? It begins with co-regulation.

Read More
Is it Anxiety?

Research shows children can begin experiencing anxiety in early childhood. As adults, we often think of anxiety as evidenced by constant worry and fidgeting. While children may exhibit these symptoms, there are a number of others ways children experience anxiety. Anxiety presents itself in a plethora of ways, such as

Read More
Managing a Meltdown

Last week, you read about how to tame a tantrum. This week, I want to provide you with further information on how to identify and help your child cope with a meltdown. Remember, tantrums often are a result of a trigger that a child can recognize. A meltdown is usually a result of overstimulation. For example, a child may have a tantrum if they do not get a toy at the store. A child may have a meltdown if they are surrounded by too many people in their class room.

Read More
The Importance of Empathy

Empathy. The word of the year. We hear about it from researchers, teachers, therapists, and our fellow parents. As humans, we could all use a little more empathy. We often confuse empathy with sympathy. To sympathize is to feel bad for how another is feeling; to empathize is to genuinely sit with another in their feeling. Empathy is seeing with the eyes of another, listening with ears of another, and feeling with the heart of another. Today I want to talk about the importance of empathy in parenting.

Read More
Hurricane Harvey: A Year Later

As we come upon the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Harvey, we may experience a multitude of emotions. Some may feel a sense of relief that the hardship of the flood is over as they move back into their homes and continue with daily life tasks. However, others of us may still sense the emotional turmoil that Hurricane Harvey left us with.

Read More
Summer Time and Play

Despite the joys of summer, many parents express feeling stress after a few weeks. I often hear statements of, “they complain of boredom,” “how much screen time is too much,” and “is it the fall yet?” If you fall in the latter category and aren’t dancing for joy with summer, that is okay! Here are some words of wisdom to get you through the summer months.

Read More
Mindfulness is for kids too!

Mindfulness, or the practice of being present in the moment, is not just for adults, it’s for kids too! Children experience stress, sadness, and frustration, as well as symptoms of anxiety and depression, just like adults do. Often times, children have difficulty identifying and expressing their emotions, as well as regulating the emotions that they experience.

Read More