Posts tagged child counseling near me
Bibliotherapy-Parent and Professional Resources for Anger

Bibliotherapy is a creative art therapeutic approach that uses literature to aid in the therapy process. Children’s books can be an excellent clinical tool to support children’s exploration and understanding of their world and life experiences. This is a great tool I often give to parents in order to continue the therapeutic work outside of the office. Many children identify with the characters in the book because they are overcoming the same obstacles. Over the next few weeks, I am going to provide a list of books that can help kids over come different obstacles from anger to anxiety. This week I’m sharing books on anger.

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School Readiness Camp: Frustration Tolerance and Communication Skills

 Welcome to the third and final week of my blog series featuring all six topics covered in Heights Family Counseling’s week long School Readiness Camp. This week’s blog will take a closer look at frustration tolerance and communication/listening skills. Below are links to 3 of my previous blogs.

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School Readiness Camp-What to Expect/Expected and Unexpected Behaviors

Have you been thinking about signing your child up for Heights Family Counseling’s School Readiness Camp, but aren’t sure if it will get a good fit? Perhaps this is the first time you are hearing about the camp and want to know a little bit more about it. This week’s blog will delve deeper into the camp’s format and a couple of topics covered. Check out my last blog for more on group counseling, the benefits of group counseling, and how to talk to your child about group counseling.

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Building Impulse Control

Impulse control is an essential skill for completing daily tasks. Impulse control takes place in our prefrontal cortex, the area of the brain that manages executive functions. Children’s brains are continually growing and certain activities can help facilitate growth.

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Using Positive Language

We are all guilty of using negative language, “stop that”, “don’t you dare”. In the moment, it is hard for caregivers to remember to stop and use positive language, especially when a child is doing something particularly dangerous.

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Co-regulation: Elementary Years

Through the elementary years, children gain insight on how to better control their emotions, behavior, and attention. Children gain the ability to cope with impulses and delayed gratification. Children begun to think about thought processes, emotion, and develop critical thinking skills.

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Co-regulation: Infancy to Pre-school

Children experience periods of rapid growth in areas of the brain associated with self-regulation. Piggy- backing off of the toddler years, it is important to continue to reinforce emotion identification, perspective-taking, calm down strategies, and problem-solving. I can not express enough how important it is to model the behavior and skills you are teaching your children.

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Teaching Kids Body Boundaries

Imagine you are getting ready to leave when grandma reaches down and kisses their grandchild. Your child accepts the kiss but as soon as they get in the car, they express their strong dislike for grandma’s kisses. You feel conflicted on what to say. You don’t want to hurt grandmas feelings, but you also want to make your kid feel comfortable. This is a common situation and a perfect open door to begin talking to your child about their body boundaries and consent.

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Overreactions, Exaggerations, and Tantrums, Oh My!

I am big on family systems therapy, even when working with individuals. This means that when I work with an individual client I keep in mind the dynamics of the entire family.

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Taming a Tantrum

You’re in the grocery store, you see a child screaming, crying, and hiding behind a rack of clothes. We’ve all probably witnessed a version of this. We quietly say in our heads, “they sure know how to throw a tantrum.” I’ve worked with many parents who seek counseling for tantrums. As I began working with more and more children, I noticed a difference in the language. Some parents would describe their child’s behavior as tantrums while others expressed them as meltdowns. Curious, I did some research.

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