Posts tagged child counseling
School Readiness Camp-Empathy and Perspective Taking/Teamwork

Welcome to week two of my three-week blog series coving our upcoming School Readiness Camp. This week’s blog will take a closer look at empathy and perspective taking as well as teamwork. Below are links to my two previous blogs.

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Summer Counseling Camps Have Arrived!!!

Does your child struggle with back to school jitters? Is your child entering kindergarten next year and unsure of what to expect? Or, would you like your child to freshen up on some skills before returning to school? Heights Family Counseling’s child and adolescent therapists, Rachel Ealy and Kristin Tallackson, are leading a school readiness camp this summer!

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Using Positive Language

We are all guilty of using negative language, “stop that”, “don’t you dare”. In the moment, it is hard for caregivers to remember to stop and use positive language, especially when a child is doing something particularly dangerous.

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Taming a Tantrum

You’re in the grocery store, you see a child screaming, crying, and hiding behind a rack of clothes. We’ve all probably witnessed a version of this. We quietly say in our heads, “they sure know how to throw a tantrum.” I’ve worked with many parents who seek counseling for tantrums. As I began working with more and more children, I noticed a difference in the language. Some parents would describe their child’s behavior as tantrums while others expressed them as meltdowns. Curious, I did some research.

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The Power of Pause

I work with children and parents who often have trouble “pausing”. As humans, our first instinct is to react when a situation arises. When our child is not listening to us, our first instinct is to respond with a demand. It usually sounds something like, “If you don’t _____, I will____”. These reactions, in part, are due to time restraints, stress, and a lack of understanding of what our child’s behavior may be indicating.

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The Importance of Empathy

Empathy. The word of the year. We hear about it from researchers, teachers, therapists, and our fellow parents. As humans, we could all use a little more empathy. We often confuse empathy with sympathy. To sympathize is to feel bad for how another is feeling; to empathize is to genuinely sit with another in their feeling. Empathy is seeing with the eyes of another, listening with ears of another, and feeling with the heart of another. Today I want to talk about the importance of empathy in parenting.

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What do all these letters mean?: ACT

The therapy world is filled with so many acronyms and it can get confusing and overwhelming. Each week, I will break down several of the acronyms you may have heard or read about.

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My Selfish Experiment

I embarked on a journey in 2017. A journey that I didn’t even tell my closest friends about. I declared to my husband on New Year’s Eve last year that this was a “me year.” I unapologetically said I was going to be “selfish” this year. You see, my life previously was very similar to many parents out there. Constantly thinking of everyone else, putting my children before me, putting my husband before me, and putting my job before me. I was exhausted, unhappy with life, and in a state of constant exhaustion.

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